For Week 1 of Easter

If you have been doing so during the season of Lent, then I invite you to continue the practice of spiritual reflection as we begin the 50 celebration of Eastertide! Easter is too amazing to relegate to just ONE day! We follow the church seasons and Eastertide is time to revel in the joy of being and seeking signs of New Life in Christ. In the weeks to come, we’ll hear how the presence of the Risen One affected those first to experience him. Take time this first week of Easter to reflect upon the thoughts I’ve written below — better yet: find a friend to reflect together!

Blessings for the start of the Season of Easter!!!

Pastor Jule

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          — We can draw the shape of life as the resiliency spiral:  an upward slant with a curved loop underneath, like a comma hanging mid-sentence.  One author writes that “the upward line begins to curve back on itself and eventually curves down.  Resiliency is trusting that the curve will come back up . . . (for) when the curve heads south, God is still at work in the midst of the shifts and changes.” (WeavingsResilience, “The Resiliency Spiral;” Larry Peacock, Feb/Mar/April 2013).  The resiliency spiral is a continuous spiral of life!

          — Again standing up is the literal translation for the Greek word used in the bible to talk about Jesus’ resurrection.  Again standing up may sound so crude, so earthy as we think about resurrection.  But then again, as one has written:  “We all lie down.  We all rise up, everyday” – not on our own.  Something else awakens us each morning.  One author writes that resurrection – again standing up – is “getting up again, no matter what lays you flat.”  (Weavings:  Deliverance, “The Advent of Resurrection,” Robert Corin Morris, Nov/Dec. 1997, p 23-31).  Like Christ, we do not do it on our own, but by that mysterious power; that Life Force.  God’s mysterious power of Life that triumphs again and again and again.

1.  How does drawing the shape of life in a spiral instead of an upward, slanted line affect your outlook on life – in days that are wonderful and days that are terrible and every day in between?

2.  What practices do you undertake (or might you in the future) to increase your resiliency? 

3.  Explore how you have experienced resurrection in your life by reflecting upon those experiences that have laid you flat.  Reflect upon the fact that you again stand up.  What spiritual lessons do you carry with you from such life experiences?  How can they give you hope to face whatever is to come? 

TO GET INTO IT ANOTHER WAY (for individual reflection):

          Draw a recurring resiliency spiral on a large sheet of paper.  Begin placing your life events on this spiral – either using words, or other symbols that represent those times of life for you.  Note where you are on the spiral today and offer that to God in a time of prayer.

FOR ACTION (for individual reflection):

          For one week (or the whole season of Eastertide if you like) pay attention and keep a written log or journal of experiences of resurrection – of again standing up.  These may be from the natural world, from your own life, or from the life of those you learn about along the way.  Begin naming such experiences as signs of God’s resurrecting work.  If you’d like, share that with those who you see again standing up.  Find one way to celebrate or thank God for being the amazing God of Life!

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